Quick – Find your Disaster Re-Entry Placard!

Today,  (4/6/2020), Long Beach Township adopted an emergency Order closing access to and use of all LBT beaches, unless you are a resident or property owner but you must have your DISASTER RE-ENTRY PLACARD with you if you are on the beach.  The paragraph below is clipped directly from the LBT website.

“Effective immediately, the Township of Long Beach (“Township”) has closed access and the use of all Township beaches to all persons, except property owners and residents who were issued and are in possession of “disaster re-entry” passes/placards (“Placard” or “Placards”).  The Placards were issued following Superstorm Sandy and were recently reissued by the Township.  Persons issued the Placards may access the beach area of the Township designated on the Placards and may do so to walk and jog, but shall not engage in any other activities on the beach.  Two (2) adults, their minor children, and leashed dogs may use the Placard at any one time.  All Placards shall be prominently displayed and shall be held up and shown to any Township police and Township personnel in the vicinity.  For further details regarding the Emergency Order, a copy of the Order is posted on the Township website.”

Water Meter Installation Deadline Extended

At today’s LBT municipal meeting (4/6/2020), Commissioner Bayard reported that the deadline for installing water meters has been extend from July 1st to October 1st. The changes to the guidelines for purchasing water meters that we reported to you on April1st remain in effect.
Stay safe.  Stay healthy.
NBTA Trustees

JCTA comments on the NJ Back Bays Coastal Storm Risk Management Study’s Tentative Selective Plan (TSP)

LONG BEACH ISLAND JOINT COUNCIL Of TAXPAYER ASSOCIATIONS
209W 18th Street
North Beach Haven, NJ 08008

March 23, 2019

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Planning Division
Wanamaker Building
100 Penn Square E.
Philadelphia, PA 19107

To Whom It May Concern:

The Long Beach Island Joint Council of Taxpayer Associations (JCTA) is hereby submitting comments on the New Jersey Back Bays Coastal Storm Risk Management Study’s Tentative Selective Plan (TSP).

Our concerns reflect the lack of transparency and information provided to the public while developing the TSP. This has had a deleterious effect on our ability to evaluate and comment on the Plan’s impact on Long Beach Island (LBI).  Specifically, the systemic failure to engage in meaningful dialogue with the public entirely negates the projected Community Opportunities as reported in the TSP. Furthermore, the plan will reflect the public’s subsequent lack of understanding, as residents had difficulty finding information about the TSP even though the study reported that the TSP can be broken down into smaller regions .

Notice of the December 1, 2016 scoping meeting failed to reach the Long Beach Island public for a variety of reasons:

  1. Public notice was published in the local  newspaper (The Press of Atlantic City) that only serves the lower portion of Long Beach Island.
  2. Public was given merely 9 days of notice prior to the December 1, 2016 meeting;  both public notice and the meeting itself were held at a time when the vast majority of homeowners had already vacated Long Beach Island for the winter.
  3.  The USACE abruptly changed the TSP release several times.
  4.  JCTA sent a number of letters to the USACE and the non-federal sponsor, the N.J. Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) complaining of the initial and revised release date (all during the 2019 winter) of the TSP and requested a change of the date to the spring when it is more appropriate for public engagement. At that time, a request for a public meeting on Long Beach Island to discuss the TSP was made.  Both the USACE and DEP disregarded these concerns and released the TSP on March 1, 2019.

Evidence that the inadequate and inappropriate timing obstructed the public’s awareness of the project was found in a May 7, 2018 council meeting which found zero (0) members of the JCTA were not even minimally familiar with the NJBB study, nor had they received the outcome of the June 2016 Charrette meeting.

Subsequently, the only response to the JCTA’s concerns was from the Commander of the USACE’s Philadelphia District who provided the name, telephone and email address of the District’s Chief of Planning. However, the Chief never responded to the JCTA’s invitation to participate in an LBI public meeting to discuss the TSP and only responded to one of the 3 e-mails regarding questions on the study. Our contact with the Chief was terminated abruptly and without notification, and the DEP’s Director of Coastal Engineering demanded that all requests regarding the study are only to be sent directly to the USACE.

A comprehensive public engagement initiative should have been included in the TSP to educate the public and gain their support.  As a result of botched communications and interfacing between the TSP and the coastal communities it purports to serve, there will be lasting questions and mistrust in the USACE and NJ DEP’s ability to adequately assess and address the significant environmental threats to Long Beach Island.

Respectfully yours,

 

Peter Trainor, MPH
Chair, Environmental Committee

JCTA LETTER TSP MARCH 23 2019  [PDF]

 

Preliminary Base Flood Advisory Maps

Updated Base Flood Elevation Maps (Preliminary version) are due to be released by the end of July, 2013. They are expected to be much more thorough than the Advisory version issued this past winter. They are also reported to be more favorable v/v insurance implications.

Sample Letter Proposed DEP CAFRA Regs

N.J. Department of Environmental Protection
Gary Brower, Esq.,
ATTN: DEP Docket No. 19-06-09/482,
Office of Legal Affairs,
P.O. Box 402
Trenton, N.J. 08625

November 29, 2006

Dear Mr. Brower, Esq.,

The NJ Department of Environmental Protection has declared that there are ” different areas and geographic features of the over 1,000 miles of the New Jersey coastline”.Of these 1,000 miles, 127 miles are oceanfront. In light of this fact it seems impossible that one set of rules can apply. It should also be noted that there is a Federal Standard already in place, but the NJ DEP has decided to impose more stringent Coastal Management rules (DEP Docket No. 19-06-09/482). Why?

The methodology used to determine the need for public access, parking and restrooms is arbitrary at best. Existing utilization and projections of future demand to determine the need and location of public access, parking and restrooms have not been performed by the DEP.

The State Aid formula is unclear regarding allowable project activities and level of state funding. The State Aid agreement is totally arbitrary as to its involvement.

The uniqueness of Long Beach Island must be factored into this project. LBI is a coastal community setting with residential, recreational atmosphere. The only
commercial enterprise here is to serve that need. The “culture” of LBI has not been factored into this project.

DEP’s theme to require public access is based upon the Public Trust Doctrine. Under the Doctrine, the coastline is held by the State in trust for the benefit of ALL the people and not just residents of LBI. However, the DEP is requiring local taxpayers to share in the cost of access, parking, and restrooms for ALL the people. If the benefits are for ALL the people then it is the responsibility of the State to pay ALL the costs.

It is felt that this proposal is bad for LBI and that the “Proposed Rules” will not
be in compliance with existing standards resulting in the loss of funding for the
Beach Restoration Project.

Sincerely,
You’re Name
Address

Crosswalk Protection

Crosswalk protection is being sought through the Mayor and the County in the form of a pedestrian-controlled blinking light at the 25th St. crosswalk.  The Mayor has indicated that work is in Process.